On Dreams

THE DREAM OF SAINT JOHN DAMASCENE

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At my most sober, center, and worked, I start having the strangest, most detailed, oriented dreams. When things start going lucid, I’m always stuck in a physical space, a movie theater, a mall, sometimes an unfamiliar city, or suburbia. I think my own inherent suspicion and anxiety make it go bad, sour, but there also seems to be something there, watching me, security, the man in black. As a child its a shapeshifting empty, black hole monster, It. With maturity it manifests in real world concerns, personal relationships, physical and emotional harm to self and other. It tries to scare ya.

The movie theater, mall setting is the most common. That’s what really gets to me. Being in a room with all those other people. I start thinking, you want to say that they’re just a figment of your imagination, that its just filler-people pulled from your memory, but in the dream it doesn’t feel that way. They feel real, they react real, slow, life-like, dreamy. What happens with me is I will become suspicious of the authenticity of the whole endeavor, and my subjugation in it. This seems to “wake me” up in the dream, and that provokes a force to come play cop on the whole thing, scare you awake. Scare you awake. Think about it. When you dream there’s a thing in there that wants to wake you up….What?

I’d like to fight it. Knuckles and bones, teeth. I don’t know what that means about me. I can accept maybe its a symptom of my own broken, depressive, scared self. I can imagine others free from this creature, entity. But to what degree? What could you do if you were free in that space? Does it have to be this way?

There’s usually a shake-down with the Shadow Monster. Breath on your neck. Recently they had a futuristic, neon blue probe body scanning systems, armed guards in glossy stormtrooper black. Empty your pockets. But then the vertigo, the flee, the scene has to change. Usually it ends with running, then some subtle torture until you wake up. But what about the moments it bleeds over into reality? What then?

Get Out of the Yellow Submarine 

Jordan Peele Writer/Director of Get Out

Woke up my peepers was broke. The Voodoo got me; I spected it would. I tried to keep it off, set up Stoney Blue Heart, remembered the Two Prayers.

Borrowed Jason Peele’s Get Out from my brother. He told me he couldn’t wait to hear what I had to say about it. I shook my head, told him it wasn’t good, already had the intel this was an active program. Knew it must  have  gotten to me, when I woke up with reader eye, which is like when you try to see one of those hidden 3D pictures, but  instead you get an involuntary vague grey outline of the thing, that kicks my focus out of whack. 

But here I am, still typing out the blurry words. I decided to take a minute for Art, watch the Beatles Yellow Submarine. Hopefully to wash off the joo-joo off from the nite before. It starts with the song in the main credits. It’s in another language, haunting words; I looked it up, found this interesting explanation: 

One of the many things from Get Out that will stay with you is the music. Donald Glover’s “Redbone” is played, and there’s a creepy sequence with “Run Rabbit Run” by Flanagan and Allen, but the song that I can’t get out of my head is actually part of the film’s original score. It plays during the main credits and at the end of the film, and it’s called “Sikiliza Kwa Wahenga.” 

Writer/director Jordan Peele talked about the song in a recent interview with GQ:
“It’s Swahili, actually. It’s such a cool track. I was into this idea of distinctly black voices and black musical references, so it’s got some African influences, and some bluesy things going on, but in a scary way, which you never really hear. African-American music tends to have, at the very least, a glimmer of hope to it — sometimes full-fledged hope. I wanted Michael Abels, who did the score, to create something that felt like it lived in this absence of hope but still had [black roots]. And I said to him, ‘You have to avoid voodoo sounds, too.’

The words are issuing a warning to Chris. The whole idea of the movie is ‘Get out!’ — it’s what we’re screaming at the character on-screen. They go, ‘Brother, brother,’ in English, and then something to the effect of, ‘Watch your back. Something’s coming, and it ain’t good.'”  Source

“Have to avoid voodoo sounds too” Thats the kicker, isn’t it? Hate to break it to Peele, ah never mind. I know he gets it. Get Out is about doubling, two. Watch it with that in mind. How many times two things, or its multiple, is given focus. And the pillars, Joachim and Boaz, two, how they frame each stage and development of the film. Movies and life are all about what’s going on in the empty space, the background. How things are arraigned and presented. 

Get Out is about mind control and is mind control. Doubling, subject and object, these are processes which take place between the film and the audience as well. There are shots from the characters point of view, which subconsciously encourage us to see things from their perspective. Sorry my eyes are blurring, need a minute of the Fab Four. 

I look at all the lonely people… Trauma is the first step in mind control. Ignite the fight or flights response, distort the higher function, cut off escape, offer alternative cessation of discomfort, put the tea on. There’s this critical scene in all horror movies, the sort of we’re not in Kansas anymore moment, where the rabbit realizes they’ve been caught in the trap. It’s actually a moment of relief for the audience. It’s a breather before the big show. In Get Out this moment occurs when he tries to leave and is stuffed in the basement, with the old TV! 

Would you believe me if I told you I was being followed by a yellow submarine? I wouldn’t. 

I can’t even properly explain Get Out. It’s a program, a racial division program. I’m gonna do some research on writers and background of the film. Also, I will do more research on other people’s response to it. I bet you will find an interesting difference, in different races response to it. Obviously. I think most white people will express horror and surprise and black people will be less surprised, and more, shall I say cautious/conscientious? towards it. Everyone should be taking a deep seat in the existential sweat lodge. So let us not talk falsely now, the hour is getting late…